​​​ABOUT HEALTH SERVICES

School health services are provided through school nurses at each school. Their goal is to promote the health and safety of students by helping them acquire health knowledge and by responding directly to students' health needs. Our goal is to maintain, improve and promote the health and safety of students so that quality education is achieved. The school nurse strives to develop, conduct and interpret the purposes of the school health program, using the "human wholeness" concept to help each student become the best he or she can be physically, mentally, emotionally, socially and spiritually in light of and in spite of his or her limitations.

RESPONSIBILITIES

  1. Provide for every child the most immediate and effective care possible in the event of illness or injury at school.
  2. Supervise the administration of medication at school according to district policy.
  3. Maintain current health records, including immunizations, for each student.
  4. Enforce communicable disease control measures for the protection of each child.
  5. Conduct a program of vision and hearing screening, referral and follow-up.
  6. Participate in planning, developing, implementing and assessing the district health curriculum.
  7. Utilize formal and informal teaching and counseling methods in working with students, faculty, families and groups.
  8. Serve as a member of a team to identify, evaluate and provide services for exceptional children.
  9. Monitor the health and safety aspects of the school environment.

HEALTH ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

All students:

  • Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis (DTaP): Five doses required. Four doses acceptable if dose four given on or after the 4th birthday. Booster dose of Tdap required at 7th through 12th grades if no previous history of Tdap vaccination regardless of interval since the last Td vaccine.
  • Poliomyelitis (IPV/OPV): Four doses required. One dose required after age 4, regardless of the number of previous doses, with a 6 month minimum interval from the previous dose.
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella: Two doses required for kindergarten through 12th grade. First dose administered on or after the 1st birthday.
  • Hepatitis B: Three doses required through grade 12.
  • Varicella (chickenpox): Two doses required for kindergarten through 12th grade.​

*unless history of varicella disease documented by a licensed physician with date (MM/DD/YYYY). Two doses are currently recommended by the ACIP for all ages.

Early Childhood students:

  • Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis (DTaP) : Five doses required. Doses given at 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, 12-15 months (6 months after dose three) and 5 years of age.
  • Poliomyelitis (IPV/OPV): Four doses required. Doses given at 2 months, 4 months, 6-18 months and 4-5 years of age.
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR): Two doses required. Doses given between 12-15 months and 4-5 years of age.
  • Hepatitis B: Three doses required. Doses given at birth, 2 months, and 6-18 months of age.
  • Varicella (Chickenpox): Two doses required unless history of varicella disease documented by a licensed physician. Doses given at 12-15 months and 4-6 years of age.
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib): Four doses required for children less than 5 years of age. Doses given at 2 months, 4 months, 6 months and 12-15 months of age. Total doses needed for series completion is dependent on the type of vaccine and the age of the child when doses given.
  • Pneumococcal conjugate (PCV): Four doses required for children less than 5 years of age. Doses given at 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, and 12-15 months of age. Total doses needed dependent on the age of the child when doses given.
  • Hepatitis A: Two doses required for children less than 5 years of age. Dose one is given at 12-23 months, with the second dose given 6-18 months later. Children 24 months and older who have not received any doses must receive two doses spaced six months apart.

First time Blue Valley students:

  • Provide a birth certificate
  • Provide evidence of current immunizations. This is in accordance with Kansas Regulation 28-1-20 and the Blue Valley Board of Education Policy 3113.2.
  • Students less than 9 years of age and entering a Kansas school for the first time must present a health assessment (physical). This is in accordance with Kansas Statute 72-5114.

Returning or transfer students:

  • Current immunizations.
  • Additional health records from former school requested.

Exemptions: Kansas law requires all students entering school for the first time in Kansas to be completely immunized for communicable diseases. Kansas law provides the following alternatives to immunizations:

MEDICATIONS

Prescription medications
If students are to take a prescribed medication at school, the school nurse must have a written note from the prescribing physician. In addition, the medication must arrive at school in the proper prescription bottle with the child's name, doctor's name, date, medication and dose.

Over-the-counter medications
For over-the-counter medications, the nurse must have a signed note from a parent and the medication must be in its original container. OTC medications will be given only for what they are intended and within the normal dose.

FLU & H1N1

The district thanks and appreciates the cooperation of parents and guardians by keeping children who are sick home for at least 24 hours after they no longer have fever or signs of fever, without using fever-reducing drugs. The health of our students and staff is important to us so we continue to ask for your support by strongly requesting that if your child is sick, please keep him or her home and follow the recommendations listed below. Additional ways you can help:

  • Teach your children to wash their hands often with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand rub. You can set a good example by doing this yourself.
  • Teach your children not to share personal items like drinks, food or unwashed utensils, and to cover their coughs and sneezes with tissues. When a tissue is unavailable, advise your children to cover up their coughs or sneezes using the elbow, arm or sleeve instead of the hand.
  • Know the signs and symptoms of the flu. Symptoms of the flu include fever (100 degrees Fahrenheit, 37.8 degrees Celsius or greater), cough, sore throat, a runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache and feeling very tired. Some people may also vomit or have diarrhea.
  • Keep sick children at home for at least 24 hours after they no longer have fever or do not have signs of fever, without using fever-reducing drugs (any medicine that contains ibuprofen or acetaminophen). Keeping children with a fever at home will reduce the number of people who may get infected.
  • In the school setting a diagnosis of an Influenza, any strain, most commonly strain A or B requires the verification from a MD, DO, NP, or PA. The verified diagnosis would lead to a recommended seven day home isolation beginning from the date reported of the onset of the illness. The date of isolation begins on the onset of illness reported, NOT THE DATE OF DIAGNOSIS.
  • Do not send children to school if they are sick. Any children who are determined to be sick while at school will be sent home.

MRSA (STAPH INFECTION​)

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) is a type of staph bacteria that is resistant to certain antibiotics. In the community, most MRSA infections are skin infections. As with all regular staph infections, recognizing the signs and receiving treatment for MRSA skin infections in the early stages reduces the chances of the infection becoming severe. Please contact your child's doctor to learn more or if you think your child may have MRSA. If your student is diagnosed with a staph infection, please notify your school nurse as soon as possible.

Hand washing continues to be the number one method of prevention of any disease or illness, including skin infections. Our custodial services department uses a cleaning agent in each of our schools specifically made to kill this strain of bacteria. Be diligent at home as well by encouraging hand-washing and avoiding sharing personal items such as bar soap, towels, razors, clothing and athletic equipment. Prevention guidelines from the Center for Disease Control (DCD) include:

  • Consult your doctor if you or a member of your family has a skin infection.
  • Wash all cuts and scratches and keep them covered with a bandage until healed.
  • Don't share personal items, as referenced above.
  • Avoid contact with other people's wounds and bandages.
  • Wash your hands frequently with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Wash gym clothing and uniforms, towels and sheets frequently and dry in a hot dryer.
  • Don't squeeze or lance pimples, blisters, insect bites or boils.
  • Use a barrier, such as a towel or clothing, between the skin and shared equipment.
  • Wipe down shared sports equipment before and after exercise.​​​​​



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